Disclaimer: CORE Kiteboarding / Hiss-Tec GmbH & Co KG assumes no liability for damage or injury caused due to an incorrectly trimmed non CORE kite and not complying with the standard setup of a CORE kite with a CORE bar.


Fundamentally, our bars have equal length lines side to side and front to back when the bar is pulled in fully and the trim/depower clam cleat/adjuster is fully released (ie. open). We do this to make our bars work with older or newer CORE kites.


Determine whether your non CORE kite meets these requirements first:


1. Line length

Our bars have equal length lines when fully powered up.


2. Front line Safety

Your kite must be able to blow out without pressure when it is held only on the Frontlines. This is the basis of the safety function of the CORE four line bars.


3. Bridle-Setup and bar flag out (ESP & SENSOR)

The flag out length of the virtual fifth line on the ESP and Sensor Bar is 490cm. This will occur when the safety is activated (ie. ROTOR is activated) Your bridle set up must allow safe flagging on the front lines.


Once the above 3 tests pass, then you may test your bar and kite in a safe location with marginal winds. Launch your kite and carefully test bar behaviour. Activate the safety if you have to. If everything seems fine, and the kite is flying nice test your safety. Twist the rotor and make sure your kite depowers and falls out of the sky and rests fully depowered on the ground or water. Your final check is actual use. Good luck!


If you have any concerns with your setup, please refer to a professional for help. If you do not feel in any way safe, stop all further testing.


Note about the deep “Y” front line CORE bar design:

In general, CORE uses a deep “Y” front line design, that is the two front lines meet close to the rider. Some kites are designed to have a higher “Y” design or no “Y” design at all. Kites that do not share the same CORE front line design may feel and fly differently. You may find kite performance suffers. You may also find kite performance improves. We obviously hope for the latter case.